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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 2:00am EDT
technologies, almost allowing people to hack into people to use the city, to use it for an experiment, and a lot of people will be excited to come here and develop new services and so on. it's a very exciting bottom-up way to do things because in a top-down way, to promote innovation, you can do it, but it requires a lot of investment. it's more like top-down approach. >> so the brand is poured by. i expect most in berlin with the guggenheim getting richer and richer but this is economic activity is really booming. >> they're not competing visions. they are complementary visions, were frankly in the case of de jure, potentially this state has a very strong role. cities are creatures of the state begin to decompress mental lives these silos and stovepipes of government that cut across. that's one way. the second piece is the notion of almost like a hacker fund. let's take an issue. energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, the low carbon city, writes? which is very much off the building environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space into the district space so to
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:30am EDT
country and a mobile phone in most the world. so before the mobile phone, only two technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. note elegies ever spread as rapidly. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and arguably before that it was fire so we know what mobile telephony means and smartphones and all that, but what does it mean for the majority of the worlds population? it's the communication highway. we dealt highways, communications highways into connecting people never connected before. in afghanistan attack about the story. you asked me about entrepreneurs who was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone can any. this is maybe the biggest story not invest in the last 10 years and we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access to mobile telephony and know how to read or write, were a decade ago that would affect about 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. it is a story. it's a big story. for an ordinary afghan incentive and means a lot in terms of capabilities. but what is more exciting you think w
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let t
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 11:00pm EDT
technology back to the people. look at all the science and technology that's going on. we lead the world. huge amount of it is working on evermore refined and reliable weapons of mass destruction. chemical, bilogical, physical. scientific brains, technological brains not applied to modern public transit, not applied until recently to solar energy, not applied to building practices for efficiency, not applied to advanced systems of sewage processes, water purification, not applied to science and technology for the people. we need that. we need to redirect it. one way is to elaborate the role of citizen sciencetists. there are thousands, now, citizens scientists. they are volunteering for environmental groups in europe, east asia, north america. what are they doing? well, they are counting the number of seals that go into a certain bay in canada. they can't hire people for that. they are measuring and detecting certain contaminants per billion parts for drinking water or soil contamination. the more citizen scientists there are, and they come from all ages, retired, students, people of mid
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:00pm EDT
this in the classrooms, is you can use technology to make the classroom or human. and i'm very careful, you mention skepticism. i'm very skeptical today. how are you going to integrated into the curriculum or leverage it to make it department khalif transform is going on and there usually aren't a lot of answers there. i think it is good to be skeptical but at the same time there is i think a reason for hope. >> how do you evaluate the impact of your courses? you talk a little bit about grades in your book and how do you know that they have actually worked? >> guest: yeah and a lot of times, when i grew up eyes sometimes we hear people say or believe in grades and i thought the were these granola bar type people. now i think i appreciate what they were saying. normally when you say people don't like grades, you think they're being touchy-feely and they are not being rigorous but they are saying grades are not rigorous enough. grades are the things that give us that feeling of rigor, a, b you know yourself an f you don't mind yourself. they are somewhat arbitrary and it depends
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
require getting out and staying out in front of the information technology revolution which has been among the most significant drivers of educational change in the last 15 to 20 years. it has also been like a runaway train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals especially from legislators and business leaders for higher education to drastically increase online education. the hope is that more students will receive college degrees after at less cost and research shows that done appropriately application of technologies can both improve learning outcomes and decrease costs of delivering that education but so far savings have proven imus sieve. nonetheless, massive open online courses are testing the market. dozens of universities including mit, harvard, princeton and stanford offer these classes from the headlines like college might never be the same. stay tuned, could be a wild ride. good ideas take time and research to explore. penn state operates a world campus with 12,000 students enrolled and dozens of full online programs. our model has b
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes t
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 12:00pm EDT
different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access the liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universal. there's no provision made in europe to support whether directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we began this enterprise. o
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 5:00pm EDT
way of exchanges. modern technology has made an elective education a reality. i saw this firsthand. in an engineering competition and the university of colorado. american companies are actively involved in the kingdom's effort to improve k-12 curriculum. keep in mind that saudi arabia is spending 26% of their budget on education. it is third-seeded american educators and businesses are supporting in a big way this modernization effort. there is a careful manage before. saudi arabia took note of this and the government moved with a 138 billion program, all targeted towards the needs and concerns of the populations. i realized that there was criticism in some circles. as if they were buying half the population with increased subsidies. but i have to say but i have to say that the government response was much more sophisticated than that. at the time, we, in the embassy, we listen listened to the top issues facing the saudi arabian population with jobs, houses, will society, and the security apparatus. after it was announced, the package, the government responded publicly on each of t
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 6:00pm EDT
camera. with 35-millimeter technology now, cannon t90, nikonf3, you can go from 3 frames to six frames a minute. this camera, you wind it like there and wind it back, you take one picture, then you have to wind it, wind it back again to take the second picture, therefore, you have to slow down and think about what you're photographing, as opposed to just starting to shoot and warm up, and then decide that you've got the certain picture or where the photographs are heading. >> for those who have never seen one of these cameras, i have it in my hand. you're talking you look down through that? >> you look down into the camera and most 35-millimeter cameras are held up to your eye and you look through them straight ahead abandon -- and with this camera, you look down into it. show it like that. >> so we put it this way. >> you're looking down into the camera. and -- >> you can't see much here. >> and there's a magnifying piece which comes up like this, which magnifies the strene you're looking at and you see through the lens, the upper lens, which is a viewing lens, and the other thing tha
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 8:00pm EDT
staying out in front of the information technology revolution, which has been among the most significant drivers of educational change in the last 15-20 years. it's also been like a run away train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals, especially from legislatures and business leaders for higher education to drastically increase online education. the hope is that more students receive college degrees faster and at less cost. in fact, research shows, done appropriately, the application of technologies can both improve learning outcomes and decrease the costs of delivering that education. so far, big safings have proven allusive. nonetheless, massive, open online courses are testing the market. dozens of universities including mitt, harvard, princeton and stanford offer these classes with headlines that "college may never be the same." stay tuned, it could be a wild ride. ideas take time to research and explore. penn state operates a world campus with nearly 12,000 students enrolled in dozens of fully online programs. the model was hono
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:30pm EDT
journal, we'll talk about how polls are conducted and analyzed and how new technology challenges the polling industry. scott of the pew research center is our guest. followed by a political overview of the state of colorado. then a look at how mitt romney and the republicans are campaigning across the state with republican strategyis sean tonner, and later, an always of president obama's strategy to win the state and elect democrats. our guest is democratic party chair, rick palacio. washington journal receives tweets and e-mails every morning on c-span. >> we have a pretty simple proposition here. you can either embrace the kind of approach that congressman wilson embraced. a tea party approach to balancing the budget. it has no new revenue. and it's so draconian it would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time. or we can embrace a balanced approach. that's what i support. i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration, when those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we're going to have
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 4:45pm EST
, infrastructure, investment in society, technology. it's an enormous issue pretty tacky for your question. >> hi. >> hi. i'm debbie goldstein. i am a gastroenterologist, but i have spent a lot of time in primary care as well. i could spend an hour counterpointing and raising. there are so many issues. it is infinite. i wanted to make a couple of points. that is, the first thing is the whole issue of primary care. the primary care physician is being asked to be the foundation the primary care physician has the most responsibility of any other position. they have to know everything. they have to know what the right and left hand is doing. they have to coordinate. there responsible for everything that they refer people to. they have the least amount of time. there the ones that have to talk to that patient who went to the orthopedic surgeon and really could have been talking about going somewhere else for palliative care. they can't do that because they have to go faster because they have to see more patients. and its crushing. it is crushing. and there is no incentive for people to
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 8:00am EST
. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwriter like kerrey for lyndon johnson, and i think he put it very aptly when he said, allowing for shades of subtlety there were many lbj is as there were people who knew him, and as often as not people they saw or contradictory. and i think that says so much about lbj. he treated everybody differently because i think as hubert humphrey called him, the world's best psychologist, he understood how to get people who mattered to say yes, and that meant treating people in very different place. so that is why i think that one of the
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 6:00am EDT
, perhaps bad but certainly are important new kind, using this new kind of technology in a ethically and legally very dicey, disputed area. and no, there has never been a public debate in congress on this. ditto for offensive cyber attacks. we see stuxnet, you know, stuxnet got reported. my colleague, david sanger, wrote about that it was part of a big, a wider range of programs called olympic games. but we have embarked again on a new technology in a very, you know, hazardous in the view of many experts area. we're setting a precedent in many countries. congress has not been able to talk about that because it's classified. we can talk about it, they can't. so you have this strange breakdown of what would normally be the sort of functioning government in a democracy. the final thing i'll say is that we talk about, um, leaks as endangering, you know, people, programs, government operations. it's very interesting to talk to tom cain, former governor of new jersey, who was the chairman of the national 9/11 commission, investigated the 9/11 attacks. if you ask him what, you know, what ma
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
talks about china. it's one of the most revolutionary technologies of any time, cell phone. why is it relevant in there are supposedly 400 million cell phones in china. we're dealing with a mobilized population. they know what's going on. they know what is happening in their vote and the world. and from my discussions with senior officials in the country, they're feeling enormous public pressure. think of the impact on politics of the scandal. of seeing [inaudible] the son out cavorting abroad with various party girls, there's been several other high level scandal in the leadership that reinforced what i believe is a growing alienation of the society from the party leadership. and as the country enters its fifth generation leadership, which is about to proceed in a form away shortly after the election and play out early next year, this leadership really does face some very fundamental issues can they open up the political process and dealing with the very substantial measure of distrust in the population. so that situation will be exacerbated if economic growth slows, people will be p
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:45pm EDT
ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud it's created economic challenges to both the industry and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here for a luncheon program on the of the commonwealth club can you see both dolph and frank in one week. [laughter] congressman frank will be here discussing the domestic and foreign policy issues pertinent to the upcoming election. it is my pleasure to extend a special welcome to any new commonwealth members of this evening. you'll need the most well-informed interesting people in the bay area when you attend the commonwealth club agents all of whom are as interested as you are in savitt discussion and social interaction. now want to th
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
works and 3-d printing is not a mass production technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates b
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
recent conference from detroit focusing on manufacturing technology and entrepreneurial activity in u.s. urban areas, techonomy detroit was a one-day conference in mid september at wayne state university. this portion of the conference includes a panel on do-it-yourself manufacturing and remarks by ben kaufman, the 25-year-old founder and ceo of quirky, a consumer product company that lets consumers decide what they produce. this portion of the conference is just under an hour.ciat >> so the next full segment ofe this program is going to be devoted to the topic of manufacturing and the future of manufacturing in the united states. so i'd like to bring out my longtime colleague when i was at fortune magazine, erick schonfeld, many years the editor of tech crunch. erick schonfeld, please, come out to lead your session on the diy economy. so thank you, erick. [applause] >> thank you. it's great to be here. h let me just quickly introduce our panelists. please have a seat. to my immediate left is grady burnett who's vice president of global marketing at facebook and lived in ann arbor f
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00am EDT
space stuff and cool technology, we got back to the point where we had to fly download over back.and over the battlefield to get these guys to shoot at us that we could find them because for instance the army and marine helicopters were common and they can't protect themselves against missiles in tripoli. so kind of degenerated back into that. so i talk a little bit about that. it was fine over back dad one day and i'd heard some guy from the flavor for me talking about seeing a bear. and i'm thinking he's sniffing glue or his oxygen system is contaminated or something not right. i've looked at us i saw a giraffe from across baghdad. all the wild animals were running but it shows something you don't think about, you don't expect. stuff like that is a matter. and that kind of close is on what i think is a positive note. you know, i don't like it when you read nonfiction and the writers kind of had this catharsis may bleed all over the pages and you walk away thinking that was heavy, though his deep. this is a little bit more positive. again, how i saw it and how it felt to come home f
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 9:00am EDT
technology will compel the u.s. to efficiently state its own legal justifications to inform future international debates about drone technology? >> um, you know, if you don't mind, i'm like the rest of you, i have no idea at this point what's classified about this topic at this point and what isn't. so i'm a bit constrained to get into that level of the specifics. i will say this, though, in terms of legal justifications, making public legal justification for what are perceived to be controversial activities, i find it, i find it surpassingly ironic that the obama administration two or three months in office basically declassified all of the olc memos. euphemistically referred to as the torture memos. again, i'm not objective about this because i was the lucky guy who had asked for it and whose name was on all of them. but as you recall, there was the program's over, it's, you know, we need to get, we need transparency to get it out there. american people deserve to know. now, again, i'm only speaking now as a private citizen. this is not based on any inside information. all i know
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
technology. >> anybody else have a question or anybody want to answer the question. >> do you think we should fighting war against the terrorist at this point or should we not, and if you do, is the way we're going about it an effective way or a way to cause -- those are the two big questions. i happen to think that if you -- what i think al-qaeda's still a problem, i grant that it is a difficult political problem for a president to say we won, and it's over. if you say it prematurely, get attacked next week, that's the end of your presidency. it's going to be over before somebody says that. >> lick benghazi. >> it happened, you know? that was local militants, not al-qaeda from above, but people, lose distinctions quickly in terms of politics, but i think there's still a reason to use them now. i don't think we're at the point yet where there's no cost. there's no reason not to use it. you want to be careful about the incentive question that you're not treating it like a hammer and everything like a nail. you want legal authority. 2001, the authorization is the legal authority, and if
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
technology and other allies in the past decade. as as a continual demand, it seems for the resources to get adequate training and to keep to a readiness at the same time dealing with other things that makes this a much more complex issue than many might appreciate and one of the challenges is when it comes time to resources it is done adequately. sorry for the op-ed. but it's really important, and i found in my experience people don't quite understand this because they are not supposed to and i don't expect that they would know. >> tell me a little bit about in your experience what particular things in the tour by difficulties in the military you think have been particularly useful or would be useful in the situations to fight and extend security in the non-traditional ways. >> i can answer that in a lot of different ways. let me start with disaster response. there's been a lot of discussion and a lot of groups over the last eight or ten years about how does the military or other branches of the government, ngos, private enterprise and host nations come together through response for dis
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 7:00pm EDT
investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, we don't focus on being more competitive or more grants. >> moderator: cohead 3 >> moderator: cohead >> it is due to the fact that our government hasn't been able to work together like everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things. it is equitably distributed. when i want to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reforms. and the evidence of benghazi. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question. >> i have campaigned with people all over the state. i think the best thing we can do is get government off of businesses back so that they understand that if they have a tax system that is fair and they can plan five or 10 years down the road in terms of buying equipment and hiring people, the best thing that they can do is get government out of the way to reduce relations and cut spending so that the economy can grow and people can have jobs to feed their families. >> moderator: over the past month we have seen gas prices fall. four years ago, there was a state record.
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind, cell phone. why is it relevant? there are supposedly 400 million cell phones in china. we are dealing with a mobilized population. they know what's going on. they know what is happening in their society. and the world. and for my discussions with senior cadre officials in the country, they're feeling a norms public pressure. thing of the impact on politics of the scandal, of seeing the sun out cavorting with berries party girls. there's been several other very high level scandals in the leadership that have reinforced what i believe is a growing alienation of the society from the party leadership. at as the country interest its fifth generation leadership, which is about to proceed in a formal way, shortly after our election and play out early next year, this leadership really does face some very fundamental issues about, can they open up the political process in dealing with the very substantial measure of distrust in the populations. so that situation will be exasperated if economic growth slo
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 6:00am EDT
. and i feel like things changed so quickly, the technology has changed things around late, think academia has a very hard time keeping up. and knowing what to tell young journalists to come to the scope what issue do. a year ago they should do everything. this year i'm reading a slew of articles i know, i want specialists again. so i think that's part of what's happening is the world of him in such a rapid pace. >> we also have this switch that with such robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as applied to media was to protect quality, to enforce quality, and to talk about best practices. with the death of the media industry, i mean, it is a death. the grass are just shocking. the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values, the vigilance and other things we care about. and so that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it can't just be about best practices, these great stories rewrote, that that sort of thi thing. >> if you want to become a documentary film maker, where'd you learn how to do that? with you
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 8:00pm EDT
change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all the program. it'll be in realtime all day, please use the app, detroit labs made it, it's very good. te detroit is the way to get it up on the itunes store. everything here's on the record. we're really into q&a and hearing your voice from the audience. almost every session we will have you guys up here. you don't have to just ask a question, you can make a comment, but keep it brief. we're videoing and live streaming everything. the live stream is
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
other countries to draw their own limits. do believe the proliferation of drone technology will compel the u.s. to have its own label justification to inform international debates? >> i have no idea what is classified at this point* and what is not. i am a bit constrained to get to that level of specifics. with those public legal justifications that seemed to be controversial activities, it is surpassingly ironic the obama administration basically a declassified all of the memos used to be called the torture memos. my name was on all of them. but it the program was over. we need transparency. the american people deserve to know. i am only speaking now as a private citizen. all i know now is what i read. but the above administrations is resisting making public the legal analysis why it is inconsistent to conduct the collections against an american citizen. there withholding that. i do not understand i guess is what i am saying. >> i will interrupt to ask a question i should have started with. this losses are raised many times today. between all of these abates we have come to a way to d
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this pentup frustration,
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:30am EDT
the goddess of dawn in greek technology. who sought permission from zeus, the chief god to mary -- to marry the son of the king of troy. 's is not gave his permission trend one to marry a mortal man, but granted her anyone wish she might ask for as a wedding gift. she immediately responded oh zeus, i would ask that this only as would never die. zeus agreed. tran one had many happy years together. but while tran one as all the gods never aged began growing forgetful and wrinkled, feeble and zeus was quite miffed when tran one came back to him and begged him to do something so that the chief god changed the felony is into cicada a well-known insect in the midwest. sometime later but not too long ago, with his strength fading and his memory becoming more porous, the senator said to me one day, you know, jim i think those greeks might have been on to something. [laughter] perhaps that is why george said right here on this stage exactly 20 days ago, when he was hoping the orchestra and they were doing this wonderful performance performance, he said i keep looking for old friends who
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 4:00pm EDT
insight and technology. i was think of projects we could do together. i started a site called geek dad, projects on for you and for the kid. i feel constantly at getting them interested. perhaps because i'm trying so hard. one weekend, one friday at the office we got two boxes they came in in the first was a lego kit that was really cool. the go with sensors like a robot, really good and the other box was a remote control airplane. sunday will fly a plane in the park. this would be the best weekend ever. you can sort of see where this is going. saturday we dutifully put together the robot, this little three wheeled tripod and, you know, you put it together and program. a programming language i thought the kids would love it and we finally get it ready to push the button and it goes forward until it hits the wall and accept. the kids are like, you're kidding. i seen transformers. that's not a robot. i'm like okay, i've ruined robotics for children. i get it, we would have tomorrow. so go to the park tomorrow and fly a plane. go to the park and that goes right into a tree. and a worst pa
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 11:00pm EDT
proposals is that the technology in the infrastructure and system in the human capital of the gses would not be reset, that could form the basis of one of these securitize theirs to compete in the private capital market going forward. so i believe that there has been some consensus around a proposal that is feasible would work. one was issued by somebody who had an ax to. that is the mortgage association, but milstein coming from the treasury department come up or simply his view is what is best for the economy, but it's a very similar proposal in my estimation and i wish that we could move ahead with them being like this then you would be tremendous benefit icing for the taxpayers to get some usefulness out of this investment that they have made in the gses and keeping them together and functioning, to use the skeleton, to use the infrastructure and awaited that allows the taxpayer to get a benefit, to get some monetization of the investment that is then made over time. .. >> i have made my decision to leave freddie mac because i thought it was going to take a long time before we
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
blinded them or clouded their view of risk so that they rush forward with the technology before it's as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures for software makers and whether or not they're properly in balance to make sure that they're secure with their software before they release it. but i'll let him speak for himself on that. >> host: well, mr. miller, if you would speak to that. >> guest: sure. so we're in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or apple or cisco or whoever. um, and the problem is it's very difficult to write secure code, code that's perfect with no vulnerabilities. and it's hard to measure whether a code is secure. so even an expert like myself, it's very difficult for me to tell you whether if given two programs, which one is more secure than the other. so it's hard to measure, and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. so we all want to buy the latest gadget, the latest iphone or whatever, and we don't really think to ourself how secure is it? mayb
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 5:00pm EDT
are because information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani talking on taxes, health care, energy. he's introduced by tom donohue. >> if i could hav
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 8:00pm EDT
estes he can we've invested heavily in technology because the agency's technology is really any pretty dismal state. the agency never has before people think that's great you don't need so many people because you're using technology. maxtor is for my entire career's technology allows you to work smarter and better and more efficiently, but it actually doesn't diminish the need for people because you find so many more things on your technology he to do market surveillance, to look for insider trading and market manipulation and analyze our mbs and how they've been structured and see what the flaws are. so while we put a big heavy emphasis on technology investment could we also need to invest in our people and we been able to grow a little bit in the last couple of years, not enough, but a little bit. i can't really give you a number. i will say that we are at agents to just under 4000 people, with extraordinary broad responsibility. everything from accounting standard-setting oversight to money market funds and mutual funds, to market berkshire. we all read every day about market struct
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:00am EDT
asked the companies that are making technology and writing the code to shoulder the full cost, which i would argue involves creating a secure product. >> host: charlie miller what about when it comes to social media and the sharing of information that we as consumers do with google, facebook etc. etc.? does that lend itself to less secure networks? >> guest: it doesn't affect the network per se but what it does is, it puts a lot of our information and some of that prior information out there so if you never connected to the internet no one would know what you would do doing, if you are dating someone but with facebook information is there. it's still out there on a server somewhere so some back i could get to it if you wanted so i think if you consider that you know it well ago, no one would ever agree to carry around a tracking device, but now we all carry around cell phones and no one would have ever let anyone read your e-mail but right now a lot of us use e-mail and all of our e-mails are stored on it server at google so it's interesting we as a society of given our information out
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 11:00pm EDT
even that technology and other wise but we have $200 million budget and it seems to me one of the big problems we have is to defund the agency's. you don't have the resources and neither does the cftc. i know you cannot say that so neat and will not ask you to comment but anybody who cares about the capital markets like tv diamond says he is should be advocating for more money for the agency's. you cannot do that. others can. leave aside your budget request and constraints come theoretically if it had the budget it needed what would that budget the? your term is coming to an end. [laughter] it would put in context of what you really need is people who care should focus. >> every year we do submit a budget we think we need to do the job. we frequently do not get that number because of the budget process. we are open and honest what we need to do if we don't get that what we will not be able to do. in my almost four years we have invested heavily and thin technology because that was in the dismal state but now we have capabilities the agency never had before. people say you don't ne
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 8:00pm EDT
budget of $700 billion. today he is the ceo of drs technologies and other world-class labor expert. beside bill is stephen seth pinsky the former deputy assistant director of the fbi cyber division. he has the highest ranking position in the fbi cyber decision and he will be playing the fbi director swedes general cartwright playing the role of the national security advisor and the bill is the secretary of defense. this is perfect to play that role and we have steve out of the fbi. on your screen you also see their roles that they are playing on your table we also have the agenda. and dmitri alperovitch is the co-founder and chief technology officer at the computer security fixture. he focused business and government on how to protect their intellectual properties, and dmitri is to deploy the ceo of the oil company that gets hit in the exercise. and we have james lewis beside him, the senior program director for csis and he's worked at the state department and commerce and he is a leading on fiber for the united nations group of the government of experts on information security and
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 9:00pm EDT
morald political advance was eventually inseparable from material and technological advance. human progress was inevitable because of the new doctrine or discovery concerning history, that history had a mind of its own, and that it had a destination in mind from its very beginnings to its dumb csh culmination. the philosopher in this sense of the term, and american liberalism had more hagel in it than the follower, critic, carl marx, a fortunate thing for americans. now, let me offer two quotations that will characterize this kind of progressivism that infiltrated american politics. when he was the president of princeton university, woodrow wilson said something that he repeated to the people when he was running for election in 1912, and he even made sure it was included in the volume of his edited speeches from the 1912 campaign called "the knew freedom." wilson said that the objective of college education should be to make the sons as much unlike their fathers as possible. now, think about that for a moment. to make the sons unlike their fathers as possible. not because the fathe
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 12:00pm EDT
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health care r
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 12:00pm EST
seeing this play out in the technology a set we are in with the explosion of online courses. people are hungry to learn. people are hungry to improve their knowledge, not just for getting ahead career wise, but said understands the things that so many of us feel we missed out in high school because maybe they did not spend enough time on it or they did have a lousy teacher. i speak to a great many really, really dedicated teachers, especially in the social studies area, so i am not dumping on teachers. i believe we ask them to do a next to impossible job and don't give them very good tools to do it. on the other hand, i have heard for far too many people who just got turned off by, you know, that one bad teacher, with a history or biology or any subject. now they are rediscovering it. that is one of the, i think, real audiences that i have always tried to speak to, people who feel that we are in a constant process of learning and lifelong learning and that the learning should go on forever. >> host: using your don't know much about the civil war as a guide, how do you organize your
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact that they have that information to t
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 5:00pm EDT
cleaner fuels. this investment of the technology of the future of biomass, or are great jobs here in northern michigan, and we do have a life upon our enemies for our energy sources. >> moderator: thank you. you have a response? benishek: i don't think kerry understands the science of global warming. they talked about yesterday. the fact that there was dredging in the st. clair river may have led to the decrease in late here -- later on in lake erie. >> moderator: mr. mcdowell. would you support changing u.s. postal service retirement system to preserve them. if not, what is your solution to serving populated areas. mcdowell: the postal service is so important in northern michigan. it is where a lot of senior citizens rely on the postal service. but as for communications, but also for prescriptions and other ways to keep them connected to the world. 40% of the post offices were in the first congressional district and they were scheduled to be close. two distribution centers were in the congressional district and the jobs that i state, it is huge for our economy. to make sure that we
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 11:00am EDT
would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and his half-brother and almo
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
would have been no way to know for sure. and so the technology you know, the 21st century technology is really what helps unravel this. 10 years ago i would not have have been able to write this book, not the way that it is now. >> anymore questions? we have a little bit of time left for the i just want to say too something about the book that made me think. here in texas for example looking at this history and particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know, but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas. among just regular people because as the land was given away, the mexican government giving the land away was based on how many people were in your group. so if you could ring slaves than you would get more land. and so regular people bought slaves and especially in texas. there were a lot of working-class people that came with slaves in order to enhance their land grants, so i found that to be an interesting fact about texas itself. >> kind of goes a long way. just regular people in slavery. we have a little bit more
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